I stopped using ‘e’ and it was hard!

Proud as a peacock with my lipogram efforts

Look! It’s a lipogram minus that fifth symbol in our Anglo-Saxon syllabary!

My last post about not using ‘a’ in my writing was fairly fruitful. But now a similar trial has found its way onto my lap(top). My task? To draft a lipogram without using that fifth symbol in our Anglo-Saxon syllabary at any point in my post.

I told you so!

Why am I doing this ridiculously tricky task? A pal said that I should.

That’s it…

To his mind my prior post was too straightforward and had nothing to it.

Don’t assign any “A’s” to your writing? No probs! Any fool with a modicum of insight and imagination can do that!

But that fifth symbol. That sign that is customarily found in our writing. Omitting that is a fitting confirmation of skill (and impulsivity).

Prior to this I thought I was foolhardy. Now I know that I am just a stubborn ass in my pursuit of lipogrammatic triumph.

I want to say to my old amigo “I told you so! I told you I could do it!”

So it’s onwards and upwards from this point forward.

Sitting on top of a building looking down at the world beneath your feet.

THIS is strikingly difficult.

But still a fantastic brain workout.

As with my last post of this kind, I truly savour how writing drills of this sort focus your mind. By imposing limitations and constraints on your work you ask that your brain think in distinct ways to find solutions.

It boosts your vocabulary too!

Any author or artistic individual will find this kind of activity fulfilling and possibly a bit hooking.

I know I do!

Mostly to confirm that I can actually accomplish such a tortuous task.

This is why YOU should try it.

Lipograms afford you an opportunity to amplify your capacity with words.

If you blog, you must try this task.

If you find joy in writing, you will fancy giving this a go.

If nothing, it’s a fantastic distraction from doing actual work! I think that is a major contributing factor to my frolics with lipograms.

As with anything you do, it’s a bit of a thrill to find triumph in any taxing task.

Writing this lipogram was fun.

And that’s most important.

I found I was grinning on many occasions during my writing. Such silly actions can add fun to a working day, and possibly stop it from spiralling down into banality.

It’s a way of splitting up that long list of tasks you must finish, with original and unusual thinking. It might aid you in accomplishing your goals by providing you with a surprisingly vanguard approach to your work.

In summary…

Writing should thrill you.

So add fun to it!

Assist and boost your brain into thinking in distinct ways. If your writing is stagnant you will find this kind of activity handy. It’s a practical way out of mind rot.

Why not play along? Do your own lipogram.

Push your mind and your words to work for you.

So, in conclusion…

I want to proclaim this as a linguistic victory.

I’m as proud as a bird with ridiculously long tail quills!


Gar’th

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Is it possible to write a blog post without using the letter ‘a’?

Man writing a letter in his journal

OR, “Is it possible to write without using the first morpheme in the English linguistic system?”

This is difficult. Every other word I wish to use includes the forbidden letter! I don’t know why I set myself this test.

Never mind. Here goes.

I’m proving nothing, except being one dogged, determined moron, striving to justify this ludicrous blog.

It’s completely impulsive; needless even. But there you go. Up to this point it’s been shown to be possible.

How long will I keep it up?

Who knows! I guess it depends on the following five things:

1) My sheer bloody-mindedness. The demented willingness to continue with this buffoonery.

b) The need to hit the prerequisite word count for blog posts. You know, for SEO purposes of course.

c) It gives me more time to think of which keywords to include… Which ones get reproduced often enough throughout this post? Plus, more words will help hike up my word count.

d) People like lists! Or so I’m told.

e) The childish joy I derived from contriving this list without using the letter in question.

Lightbulb

Letter could be the keyword I’m looking for!

Come to think of it.

It does seem the most likely. So I’ve included it in the sub. Then it becomes obvious to everyone. It is definitely the subject of the blog.

Envision the Google query: blogs touching on the subject of letters.

Completely nuts!

But honestly, this isn’t so difficult, now I consider it.

I think I’ve proved the point I set out to prove.

It is entirely possible to write enough semi-coherent content without using the letter I set out not to use.

I think I’ve done pretty well to get to this point. Even though it’s not my best piece of written work – quite repetitive I feel – I hope it will get me noticed!

It’s been childish, frivolous, idiotic, but downright good fun! If you enjoy writing, of course.

But now I think I’m done. So I’m going to sign off.

Why don’t you try it?

Go on. Test yourself!

Let me know how it goes! Comment below or Tweet me.

G’reth

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Brief: Be Brief! The Secret To Sending Your Creative Mojo Into Daily Overdrive With One Minute Briefs

Done in 60 Seconds. The One Minute Briefs Way!

It’s Throwback Time!

“Brevity is the soul of wit.” Said Shakespeare of One Minute Briefs.

Not really.

Although he could have done!

It’s a great line.

Ironic though. The line is delivered by Polonius in Hamlet. A man who is not known for his brevity. Nor his wit.

I suppose, the dramatic irony of knowing this, makes it an AWESOME line!

Thank you Shakespeare. You clever little sausage!

He’s right though. Polonius.

Being brief is a talent.

Just ask Thomas Jefferson:

“The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.”

Some of the best ideas come to you in a flash. Some of the worst concepts are devised by committee after a long, drawn out process of discussion and debate.

Therein lies the beauty of One Minute Briefs. An addictive creative challenge devised by Nick Entwistle of The Bank of Creativity (and now Trunk Agency).

One rule. One Minute. Create an ad.

As brief as a brief gets.

One Minute Briefs gets you thinking. Sharpens your writing. Inspires creativity.

And it doesn’t take much time.

Since discovering @OneMinuteBriefs on Twitter, my creative disposition has changed and my output has greatly improved.

As a creative tool, there really is nothing like it. It’s perfect practice for the real thing. And I’m unashamedly addicted to it.

Some of my best ideas and concepts have only taken a minute of my time to devise.

Whilst walking back to work from lunch, the idea for my winning entry to the Man City Manager brief just popped into my head.

Half way through a tuna salad wrap, I devised another winning entry for advertising an electrician!

Notice the theme of my inspiration?

And then there are all the other entries. Some good. Some bad. All brief.

The effects of this regular creative work are long-lasting.

A whole concept for the Audi R8 just materialised from a brief about sports cars.

It has developed into a portfolio piece that I am particularly proud of. A piece that I continue to develop. All because I took a minute out of my day to be creative.

Take a minute out of your day to be creative.

Follow @OneMinuteBriefs on Twitter. Check out the OMB blog or Facebook Page to see all past briefs and winners.

It works for me. It’ll work for you.

Remember. Some of our greatest experiences only take one minute!

Postscript 2018

A lot has happened since I published the original version of this piece.

Year on year, One Minute Briefs has continued to grow and is now a Verified Account. It has developed into a massive online community of nearly 16,000 followers. Many are regular contributors. And these contributors are made up of a range of industry experts, award-winners (including Chip Shop Awards Grand Prix Winners in 2016 and 2017), students and hobbyists.

It has its own OMBoard of OMBassadors (of which I am one)- advocates and acolytes who help promote and build this unique advertising platform.

Collaboration is encouraged. Criticism is constructive. Discussion is supportive.

Everyone improves.

Anyone can be an OMBLE. Anyone can win. And win Big!

Businesses are regularly seeing the benefit of using One Minute Briefs as a means of advertising and promoting their products and services. As are charities. And there are big prizes on offer.

However, the biggest prize of all is one that hasn’t changed since OMB’s inception.

Your creative mojo will go into overdrive.

And you’ll notice it!

So what are you waiting for?

Advertise…

 

Toothpicks…

 

Go!

 

Gareth

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